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Logo Design History
The history of logo design and logos dates back to Greece in ancient times. The word “logo”
means a name, symbol or trademark designed for easy recognition. Logo design history had it's
humble beginnings as a cipher consisting of a single letter, and later a design or mark consisting
of two or more letters intertwined. The cipher may be either all the letters of a name, the initial
letters, or the surname of a person for use on stationery, business cards, or elsewhere. Many
early Greek and Roman coins bear the monograms or logos of rulers or towns. The most famous
of these early logos is the sacred monogram, which is formed by the conjunction of the first two
Greek letters of X R, S, T, O, and S; (Christ), usually with the A (alpha) and O (omega) of the
Apocalypse on each side of the coin. The Middle Ages were extremely prolific in inventing
ciphers In the thirteenth century, logo design evolved from simple ciphers to trademarks for
traders and merchants. These early examples of logo design includes masons' marks,
goldsmith's marks, paper maker's watermarks and watermarks for the nobility. Other related
logo devices are the colophons used for identification by publishers and printers. The emergence
of the information age changed the face of logos and logo design. Today, the general public has
become increasingly aware of visual symbols, especially those used as trademarks. It is
important that the company logo look professional. Company logos are the face of the business,
not only to the public, but to its employees and the company itself. Logos have become the front
line of the company, the corporate identity. The mark of a good logo is legibility and good brand
recognition. Because of the diversity of products and services sold by many businesses today,
the need for new, unique logos is even stronger. Since logos are the foundation of a company's
visual image, a first-rate logo design is vital. A professionally designed logo is a must for anyone
who has a business or product that they want to promote via any medium. www.logotree.com

The History of Military Patches
The U.S. military patch, also referred to as the shoulder sleeve insignia, is a relatively new
component of the modern military uniform. The military patch became common during World
War II after originating during the first World War, when Gen. John J. Pershing authorized its
limited use. The patches for the Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force and Coast Guard are a source
of pride among personnel and have become collector items for civilians. The insignia is an
embroidered patch that identifies the corps, division or brigade of the person wearing it. It is
generally placed on the upper shoulder, but also can be placed on the helmet. It's either sewn
onto the uniform or attached with Velcro. Up until World War I, most U.S. military uniforms
carried no patches. But during the Civil War, many Union soldiers carried corps, division or
brigade identification on their forage caps. The only sleeve patches were rank stripes. No
soldiers wore any government-authorized patches during the military campaigns against Indian
nations, the 1898 Spanish-American War and the 1916 campaign against Pancho Villa. World
War I The first patch was formally introduced in May 1918 for the Army's 81st Division
Wildcats. It was suggested to Army officials as an informal acknowledgment of the division. The
Inspector General's Office approved the patch to promote esprit de corps. Pershing then
ordered all divisions wear a patch. It was later expanded to corps and brigades. The Big Red 1
Army patch is the longest surviving patch and belongs to the 1st Infantry Division, informally
known as the Big Red One. The division was issued a patch with a large “1” emblazoned on it on
Oct. 31, 1918, and is perhaps the most recognizable patch today. During the years between
world wars, the use of patches spread. By the outbreak of World War II, all corps, divisions and
brigades possessed insignia patches. Patches were unique to each division. The armored
divisions, for example, featured red, yellow and a triangle with a symbol for armor in the center.
More subdued colored patches were worn during the Vietnam War. During the Gulf Wars,
patches were colored to match camouflage battlefield uniforms. The design of the insignia patch
is the responsibility of the Army Adjutant General's Office's Institute of Heraldry. Research and
design, which focuses on the heraldry and symbolism of patches, was originally performed by
the Army Quartermaster Corps from 1924-62 before switching to the Adjutant General's Office.
Patches have evolved into a thriving cottage industry. Military veterans and civilians trade and
sell patches, although value on the market is relatively low. World War II and Vietnam War-era
patches command the most attention from collectors.
By Rob Wagner, eHow
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